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Atherosclerosis is a dangerous condition in which a patient’s artery or arteries have narrowed or closed due to plaque accumulation. Physicians typically perform a procedure called angioplasty to correct the condition. This involves inserting a balloon into a patient’s artery to clear the blockage.

While angioplasty has saved countless lives, it may not be a permanent solution. Many patients suffer a recurrence of their original condition after the procedure. To combat this problem, medical providers began inserting a device called a stent into the patient’s artery.

Stents are flexible mesh tubes that can hold the patient’s artery in the open position. This is a life-saving procedure, but like angioplasty itself, it is not always a permanent solution. Scientists found that by coating these stents in time-released drugs, it reduced arterial scarring and prevent additional plaque build-up in many patients.

Drug-coated stents have certainly solved many of the problems associated with atherosclerosis, but their use carries certain risks for patients, some of which could be considered grounds for a defective medical device lawsuit. A few of these risks include:

  • Stent migration
  • Blood clots
  • Bleeding
  • Blockage inside the stent
  • Blood vessel ruptures at insertion site
  • Allergic reactions

Another way that stent use may be risky is if the patient is not a good candidate for this treatment. It is a medical care provider’s duty to look into the patient’s medical background carefully to ensure the patient will not suffer worsening or new conditions. If the patient suffers harm because a physician failed to perform this due diligence, the victim may be able to seek a legal remedy.

Additionally, when drug-coated stent manufacturers fail to ensure that these devices are safe for the public, many patients could suffer harm. These victims can also consider a legal solution by seeking advice from a Tennessee attorney about a defective medical device lawsuit.

Source: FindLaw, “Drug-Coated Stents,” accessed Feb. 16, 2018